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Bainbridge Island and the Kitsap Peninsula have a wealth of small farms producing vegetables, fruits, meats and dairy products. The Puget Sound area also has miles of shorelines and access to fresh and saltwater fisheries.  And there are a growing number of local food artisans creating fine cheeses, breads, wines and much more. Finally, we have an ever-growing list of restaurants and food retailers who are including local food in their offerings.

The distribution system hasn’t quite caught up with all of this local abundance, so buying it isn’t as easy as walking into your neighborhood supermarket. You need to

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If you love to cook, and you’ve ever wished for a commercial, licensed kitchen right here on Bainbridge Island, you’re in luck!   Would you like to:   make value-added products from your farm produce? Have a legal kitchen from which to do catering? Have a professionally-equipped kitchen in which to take or offer cooking classes? Have a space to do big baking or canning projects, by yourself or with a group?

We’re in the planning stages of just such a kitchen, to be a part of the new BARN artisan center, and we

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Makes about 20 cookies

Ingredients:
2 sticks of unsalted butter
1 cup of sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup cooked nettles (squeeze out the cooking water and finely chop, it should look like frozen spinach)  
1 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 400F. Cream the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add the egg and vanilla and mix until combined well. In a separate bowl, combine the flour, baking soda and salt, then add to butter mixture, and mix

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A good egg and where to find it

by Adrienne Wolfe

A good egg and where to find it
The old adage “you are what you eat” holds true for chickens as well as people.  Studies have shown that the diet of the chicken greatly impacts the nutritional content of the egg.  

Eggs are making a comeback to the America table. At only 75 calories a serving eggs pack quiet a punch! They fell out of favor several years ago due to fears that they could raise cholesterol levels. But new research shows differently, and now the American Heart Association gives the thumbs up to eggs for people with normal cholesterol levels and who are not sensitive to dietary cholesterol.

Eggs from pasture-raised hens may offer the greatest health benefits of all. A chicken allowed access to its natural diet of grasses, grubs and seeds will produce an egg high in protein, low in cholesterol, high in Omega 3 and vitamin A. Pasture-raised hens have a substantial portion of their diet come from free foraging. This means walking around in grass and eating vegetation and bugs.

Pastured chickens are usually raised without antibiotics or hormones and may or may not have organic feed to supplement their diet. These chickens are the only truly “free range chickens” that are available.  And these happy chickens lay GREAT eggs! The best, and probably the only place you’ll find eggs like this is at a small local farm.

Below is a study conducted by Mother Earth magazine (October/November 2007) comparing commercial eggs to pasture-raised eggs:

Egg nutrition analysis results, 2007
All values are per 100 grams of egg.    Vitamin E (mg)    Vit. A Activity (IU)    Beta Carotene (mcg)    Omega-3s (g)    Cholesterol (mg)    Sat. Fat (g)
Eggs from Confined Birds
(per USDA Nutrient Database) .97    487    10    .22    423    3.1
Free-range Egg Averages
Mother Earth News, 2007    3.73    791.86    79.03    0.66    277    2.4

Choosing supermarket eggs
If you go to your supermarket you will be bedazzled by the array of egg options: white or brown eggs, free range, cage free, pasture raised, organic or omega eggs.  What does it all mean?

First, white and brown eggs are exactly the same in nutritional content.  At the moment brown eggs command a higher price since they are often perceived as fresher and more wholesome.  A commercial egg, regardless of color, is gathered in the same way.  Huge warehouses contain laying hens packed into cages and stacked on top of each other.  The environment is noisy, dirty and stressful.  Hens have a part their beaks clipped off to avoid cannibalism in this unnatural setting and are feed antibiotics/hormones to combat the disease and stress of their living quarters.

Commercial free range and cage free eggs attempt to alleviate some of the chaos of the commercial hen laying outfit.  Free range and cage free are interchangeable terms.  Instead of living in cages the chickens are free to roam in a warehouse.  “Roam” should be used lightly since these birds can be 91,000 per warehouse and are given approximately 67 square inches per bird.  That’s smaller then a piece of paper!  These birds are debeaked and feed antibiotics and hormones.  They will have a small opening to go outside to a caged run.  Since they’ve never learned to go outside they usually won’t!  Additionally, the door may be kept close at the owner’s discretion IE rainy, cold weather, etc.

Commercial organic eggs come from chickens given no antibiotics or hormones.  They are fed 100% certified organic feed.  They live without cages in warehouses and have the same access to outdoors as the free range chickens above. Omega eggs are created from chickens feed a diet high in flax seed and other feeds that will produce an egg that has very levels of healthy Omega 3 fatty acids.

So visit one of the local chicken farmers on the list below and welcome eggs back to your healthy food choices!  Make that frittata, omelet or strata with some wonderful locally raised eggs and enjoy.

Bainbridge Island egg sources
Bainbridge Island Farmer’s Market
Various farmers have eggs for sale

Chateau Poulet
Linda Meier
4490 Eagle Harbor Drive NE
Available at farm stand

Red Tractor Family Farm
Keith Barnes
10142 Battle Point Road
Available:  At the Family Farm Stand (June-September)

Ocean Sky Farm
Art Biggert
5191 Taylor Rd
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Available at farm stand

Rolling Bay Farm
Adrienne Wolfe
10320 NE Roberts Road
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Available at farm stand in 2008
 

Eggs are making a comeback to the America table. At only 75 calories a serving eggs pack quiet a punch! They fell out of favor several years ago due to fears that they could raise cholesterol levels. But new research shows differently, and now the American Heart Association gives the thumbs up to eggs for people with normal cholesterol levels and who are not sensitive to dietary cholesterol.browneggs

Eggs from pasture-raised hens may offer the greatest health benefits of all. A chicken allowed access to its natural diet of grasses, grubs and seeds will produce an egg high in protein, low in cholesterol, high in Omega 3 and vitamin A. Pasture-raised hens have a substantial portion of their diet come from free foraging. This means walking around in grass and eating vegetation and bugs.

Pastured chickens are usually raised without antibiotics or hormones and may or may not have organic feed to supplement their diet. These chickens are the only truly “free range chickens” that are available. And these happy chickens lay GREAT eggs! The best, and probably the only place you’ll find eggs like this is at a small local farm.

Below is a study conducted by Mother Earth magazine (October/November 2007) comparing commercial eggs to pasture-raised eggs:

Egg nutrition analysis results, 2007

All values are per 100 grams of egg.

Vitamin E (mg)

Vit. A Activity (IU)

Beta Carotene (mcg)

Omega-3s (g)

Cholesterol (mg)

Sat. Fat (g)

Eggs from Confined Birds
(per USDA Nutrient Database)

.97

487

10

.22

423

3.1

Free-range Egg Averages
Mother Earth News, 2007

3.73

791.86

79.03

0.66

277

2.4

Choosing supermarket eggs

If you go to your supermarket you will be bedazzled by the array of egg options: white or brown eggs, free range, cage free, pasture raised, organic or omega eggs. What does it all mean?

First, white and brown eggs are exactly the same in nutritional content. At the moment brown eggs command a higher price since they are often perceived as fresher and more wholesome. A commercial egg, regardless of color, is gathered in the same way. Huge warehouses contain laying hens packed into cages and stacked on top of each other. The environment is noisy, dirty and stressful. Hens have a part their beaks clipped off to avoid cannibalism in this unnatural setting and are feed antibiotics/hormones to combat the disease and stress of their living quarters.

Commercial free range and cage free eggs attempt to alleviate some of the chaos of the commercial hen laying outfit. Free range and cage free are interchangeable terms. Instead of living in cages the chickens are free to roam in a warehouse. “Roam” should be used lightly since these birds can be 91,000 per warehouse and are given approximately 67 square inches per bird. That’s smaller then a piece of paper! These birds are debeaked and feed antibiotics and hormones. They will have a small opening to go outside to a caged run. Since they’ve never learned to go outside they usually won’t! Additionally, the door may be kept close at the owner’s discretion IE rainy, cold weather, etc.

Commercial organic eggs come from chickens given no antibiotics or hormones. They are fed 100% certified organic feed. They live without cages in warehouses and have the same access to outdoors as the free range chickens above. Omega eggs are created from chickens feed a diet high in flax seed and other feeds that will produce an egg that has very levels of healthy Omega 3 fatty acids.

So visit one of the local chicken farmers on the list below and welcome eggs back to your healthy food choices! Make that frittata, omelet or strata with some wonderful locally raised eggs and enjoy.

West Sound egg sources

Bainbridge Island and Poulsbo Farmers' Markets
Various farmers have eggs for sale

Chateau Poulet
Linda Meier
4490 Eagle Harbor Drive NE
Bainbridge Island, WA
Available at farm stand
Jo's Chicken Farm
Madeline Corbin
206-842-2974
8719 Battle Point Road
Bainbridge Island, WA

Red Tractor Family Farm
Keith Barnes
10142 Battle Point Road
Available: At the Family Farm Stand (June-September)
Ocean Sky Farm
Art Biggert
5191 Taylor Rd
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Available at farm stand
Rolling Bay Farm
10320 NE Roberts Road
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Available at farm stand in 2008
 
 

What's Fresh

Bainbridge Island Farmers' Market: Opens April 12, 2014
Poulsbo Farmers' Market  Saturdays: Opens April 5, 2014
Suquamish Farmers' Market: Opens April 16, 2014

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Island Food Circle

Island Food Circle Guide

Organizes food sources by category so that it's
easy to locate an outlet that's convenient to you.